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Home >> Publications >> Hepatitis B and C Co-Infection in HIV Patients from the TREAT Asia HIV Observational Database: Analysis of Risk Factors and Survival

Publication

Author(s):

Chen M, Wong WW, Law MG, Kiertiburanakul S, Yunihastuti E, Merati TP, Lim PL, Chaiwarith R, Phanuphak P, Lee MP, Kumarasamy N, Saphonn V, Ditangco R, Sim BL, Nguyen KV, Pujari S, Kamarulzaman A, Zhang F, Pham TT, Choi JY, Oka S, Kantipong P, Mustafa M, Ratanasuwan W, Durier N, Chen YM.

Pub Title:

Hepatitis B and C Co-Infection in HIV Patients from the TREAT Asia HIV Observational Database: Analysis of Risk Factors and Survival

Pub Date:

Mar 2 2016

Pub Region(s):

Asia-Pacific

Journal:

Title: 
PLoS One
Link: 
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4774987/

PubMed: 26933963
Pub PDF:

BACKGROUND: We assessed the effects of hepatitis B (HBV) or hepatitis C (HCV) co-infection on outcomes of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in HIV-infected patients enrolled in the TREAT Asia HIV Observational Database (TAHOD), a multi-center cohort of HIV-infected patients in the Asia-Pacific region.

METHODS: Patients testing HBs antigen (Ag) or HCV antibody (Ab) positive within enrollment into TAHOD were considered HBV or HCV co-infected. Factors associated with HBV and/or HCV co-infection were assessed by logistic regression models. Factors associated with post-ART HIV immunological response (CD4 change after six months) and virological response (HIV RNA <400 copies/ml after 12 months) were also determined. Survival was assessed by the Kaplan-Meier method and log rank test.

RESULTS: A total of 7,455 subjects were recruited by December 2012. Of patients tested, 591/5656 (10.4%) were HBsAg positive, 794/5215 (15.2%) were HCVAb positive, and 88/4966 (1.8%) were positive for both markers. In multivariate analysis, HCV co-infection, age, route of HIV infection, baseline CD4 count, baseline HIV RNA, and HIV-1 subtype were associated with immunological recovery. Age, route of HIV infection, baseline CD4 count, baseline HIV RNA, ART regimen, prior ART and HIV-1 subtype, but not HBV or HCV co-infection, affected HIV RNA suppression. Risk factors affecting mortality included HCV co-infection, age, CDC stage, baseline CD4 count, baseline HIV RNA and prior mono/dual ART. Shortest survival was seen in subjects who were both HBV- and HCV-positive.

CONCLUSION: In this Asian cohort of HIV-infected patients, HCV co-infection, but not HBV co-infection, was associated with lower CD4 cell recovery after ART and increased mortality.

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Citation:

PLoS One. 2016 Mar 2;11(3):e0150512. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0150512. eCollection 2016. Hepatitis B and C Co-Infection in HIV Patients from the TREAT Asia HIV Observational Database: Analysis of Risk Factors and Survival. Chen M1,2,3, Wong WW4, Law MG5, Kiertiburanakul S6, Yunihastuti E7, Merati TP8, Lim PL9, Chaiwarith R10, Phanuphak P11, Lee MP12, Kumarasamy N13, Saphonn V14, Ditangco R15, Sim BL16, Nguyen KV17, Pujari S18, Kamarulzaman A19, Zhang F20, Pham TT21, Choi JY22, Oka S23, Kantipong P24, Mustafa M25, Ratanasuwan W26, Durier N27, Chen YM1,28.